Category Archives: Journal

PIDP 3260 Professional Practice Journal Entry 3

Objective:

 “…students often say that such teachers ‘walk the talk’.” This quote was taken from the context of authenticity. “Walking the talk” refers to the fact that such instructors genuinely want to teach in an environment where the learner’s interest is valued. This includes being open and honest with the class without hidden agendas. When setting the ground rules for your class and holding yourself accountable to these rules is what your class can appreciate. “Authenticity here finds expression in consistency between values and actions.” (http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/faculty-development/six-paths-to-more-authentic-teaching/)

 

Reflective:

 As stated earlier, I believe students can appreciate it when they feel they are in an environment where their learning is a priority. Teachers who falsely try to create such an environment because they think can cause disappointment when the class identifies that it isn’t authentic. “Nothing destroys students’ trust in teachers more quickly than seeing teachers espouse one set of principles or commitments (for example, to democracy, active participatory learning, critical thinking, or responsiveness to students’ concerns) and then behave in ways that contradict these.” (Brookfield, 2006)

 

Interpretive:

In order for an instructor to ‘walk the talk’, I believe the main characteristic is to be honest. You must truly believe in the rules you set out and state the guidelines of classroom clearly so the class understands what kind of learning environment you are creating. However, being authentic is not just having a set of rules, it’s the integrity of your belief system when it comes to education. “Whenever we promote success to students without first modeling it, we’re seen as hypocrites in their eyes, even if they don’t admit it. In addition, we lose credibility in the classroom. (http://www.educationworld.com/a_curr/columnists/martin/martin011.shtml)

Decisional:

 

When it comes to being an instructor, I want to be one that ‘walks the talk’. If and when I have a classroom of my own, I do not want to deceive my class. I want to put my students learning as top priority or I wouldn’t to teach at all. There is no point in teaching if I cannot gain trust from my students and be regarded as authentic. I want to be very clear about the learning environment I want to create and uphold my integrity to keep my promise on how the class is going to run. “So an important part of skillful teaching is to find ways to communicate regularly your criteria, assumptions, and purposes and then to keep checking in to make sure students understand these.” (Brookfield, 2006)

References

Brookfield, S. D. (n.d.). Skillful Teacher: on Technique, Trust, and Responsiveness in the Classroom {Jossey-bass Higher and Adult Education Series ; 2nd Ed.}. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (US). Pages 68 and 70.

 

Weimer, M. (PhD). Six Paths to More Authentic Teaching. Retrieved from http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/faculty-development/six-paths-to-more-authentic-teaching/

 

Martin, J. The Educator Motivator – Teachers Must Earn Students’ Respect. Retrieved from http://www.educationworld.com/a_curr/columnists/martin/martin011.shtml

Advertisements

PIDP 3260 Professional Practice Journal Entry 2

Objective:

“…there will be very few standardized practices that help students across the board learn essential skills or knowledge. An approach that one student finds particularly useful or congenial may well be profoundly unsettling and confusing to the student sitting next to her.” (Brookfield, 2006, page 17). With a quote like this, it makes you wonder how an instructor will deal with this reality. How do you deal with the fact that when using certain teaching practices, only a fraction of your class are grasping the concept, where the rest are getting more confused? Will instructors be on the never-ending quest to find these few techniques that can reach all of your students?

Reflective:

When I read this quote, the 2 words that jumped out at me were ‘standardized practices’. It made me think about the term and question: What is the purpose of standardizing teaching practices? What benefits does it have for the learner? I ask those questions because as I am going through the PIDP, the main focus is the learner and it’s obvious why. Our success as instructor hinges on the fact that we help students learn. When you think about standardized practices, it doesn’t make me think about the learner. I feel the benefits of standardized practices are within the institution’s administration to create consistency in teaching, not learning. I found an interesting website that discusses areas of standardization and weighs the advantages and disadvantages. “The most obvious and concrete problem with standardizing level, pace, and path is illuminated by how poorly that serves students who are far from “average” in any given academic area.  It isn’t news that students who “get” the material quickly often disengage due to boredom and students who struggle disengage due to hopelessness.”

http://www.gettingsmart.com/2013/04/education-standardization-essential-or-harmful/

Interpretive:

When I look at this quote, I feel it has validity. To think that there are certain practices that will reach all your students is unreasonable. As a result, instructors will need to find multiple practices to reach all your students. When starting a new class, you must be prepared to face students with different personalities, cultures, and beliefs. No two classes will be exactly the same with an entire class ready to learn concepts in one particular fashion. As the instructor, this is an opportunity expand your mind and discover new ways to reach certain types of students. “”We want to have a class where everyone can be successful because we need everyone to be successful,” says Brian Lukoff, an education researcher at Harvard who is studying ways to more effectively teach large classes.” http://americanradioworks.publicradio.org/features/tomorrows-college/lectures/rethinking-teaching.html

Decisional:

As I have stated earlier, in order to have a lesson be effective to my entire class, I cannot rely on standardized practices. Every class I intend to teach will be different from one another and it is part of the job to understand what types of personalities, learning styles, and beliefs I am working with. From there, I will have to decide what combination of practices and techniques will work best with my current class. “The most we can hope for in facing them is that we settle on responses that make sense for context in which we find ourselves, and that lessen rather than exacerbate the tensions we inevitably feel….I know I will never connect with everyone’s preferred learning style 100 percent of the time because the diversity of my students’ personalities, experiences, racial and cultural traditions, and perceptual filters (as well as my own personality, racial identity, learning style, cultural formation, and professional training) make that impossible. (Brookfield, 2006, page 9) Having read that, it doesn’t make sense to believe that I would be able to find a one style fits all practice in instruction.

References

Brookfield, S. D. (n.d.). Skillful Teacher: on Technique, Trust, and Responsiveness in the Classroom {Jossey-bass Higher and Adult Education Series ; 2nd Ed.}. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (US). Pages 9 and 17.

Bjerede, M. (2013, April 26). Education Standardization: Essential or Harmful?

http://www.gettingsmart.com/2013/04/education-standardization-essential-or-harmful/

Media, A. P. (2017). Rethinking the Way College Students Are Taught. Retrieved February 26, 2017

http://americanradioworks.publicradio.org/features/tomorrows-college/lectures/rethinking-teaching.html

 

PIDP 3260 Professional Practice Journal Entry 1

Objective:

The quote I chose to write about is “…teaching is frequently a gloriously messy pursuit in which shock, contradiction and risk are endemic.”(Brookfield, 2006, page 1). I chose this quote because I found it interesting and lighthearted how the author uses irony to describe teaching. In most cases glorious has little relation to messiness and in this case the word frequent was included as well. That makes it all the more interesting to me.

Reflective:

When describing the experiences of teaching, Brookfield uses the words shock, contradiction and risk. Does he use these terms to reference how the instructor feels when teaching? Is it referenced for the students? Or both?

As a student, I have felt shock when the subject taught is overwhelming. I can only assume that an instructor can run into shock when an unanticipated result comes from a lesson. “When a racially motivated fistfight broke out on my second day of teaching, all I could do was try to muddle through.” (Brookfield, 2006, page 2).

The other word that caught my attention in the quote was risk. What are the risks in teaching? Lesson plans itself can be a risky. You can come up with what could be a brilliant plan, but would it work for every class? Would every class be engaged because of its design? “…I had prepared a series of dazzlingly provocative questions for classroom discussion that I felt were bound to generate heated, rich, and informed conversation amongst students. I asked the first question and was met with blank stares and total silence.” (Brookfield, 2006, page 4). Risk could also involve the students. Those blank stares in the last cited passage could represent student’s reluctance to participate. This may be due to the insecurity of how their answers would be judged. This is also a risk.

Interpretive:

When analyzing this quote and going through the first chapter, the underlying theme I feel Brookfield has established is that teaching in unpredictable. Not all classes are going to be the same. There will be times where things are going to happen that you won’t be able to foresee. For an instructor to succeed you are going to have to be adaptable. For lessons to be effective lesson plans may need to be altered. Different approaches may need to be used to teach the same subject to different classes

Here is a link to a site about Differentiated Instruction. It gives examples of different approaches one can take to alter their lesson.

Decisional:

As I said earlier, I liked how this quote had a lighthearted feel to it. You can tell Brookfield is passionate about this subject and I can find inspiration in this quote. It makes me believe that when and if I have a classroom of my own that I won’t take it for granted. I understand that the personalities in each classroom will be different and it is up to me to cater the lesson plans to the type of students I am teaching. Having the notion that you can teach a subject exactly the same way to multiple classes would not be acceptable. “…, being aware that we regularly face inherently irresolvable dilemmas in our teaching, and that we hurt from these, is an important indicator that we are critically alert. Teachers who say that no such dilemma exist in their lives are, in my view, either exhibiting denial on a massive scale or getting through the school day on automatic pilot.” (Brookfield, 2006, page 9)

References

The Skillful Teacher on Technique, Trust, and Responsiveness in the Classroom second edition
by Stephen D. Brookfield, 2006, pages 1, 2, 4, and 9

Differentiated Instruction by TEAL Center staff – Adapted from two NCSALL Focus on the Basics articles, Vol. 7, Issue C, and Vol. 8, Issue D.

https://lincs.ed.gov/programs/teal/guide/differentiatedinstruction

PIDP 3240 Journal Entry 3

Objective:

Educational or digital badges is a new online credential for learners to achieve specific skills and experiences in a shorter time frame than the years it would take to get a degree. “In keeping with the idea (from both gaming and educational research) that smaller rewards and less distance between levels increase success and motivation, badges are awarded for specific skills in smaller increment of learning (Young, 2012) (Bowan 2014).

Although the concept is still quite new, early research has been positive with some recognizable institutions starting to adopt this credential. Here is a blog on badges and how it may affect a local institution like UBC. Digital Badges in Education: a quick overview

 

Reflective:

Seeing how the landscape of education is being changed because of the emergence of online learning, I can see how scaling down the effort of achieving a degree by earning badges can be appealing. Because the skill set is designed to be specific for each badge, you can set out a plan to customize the skills you need for the job that requires those skills. “People who earn digital badges signify to employers what their skills and knowledge are regardless of whether or not they possess a degree.” (CBS news – Forget College Degrees: Earn Digital Badges Instead).

Being able to prove to employers that you have the required skills and experience is important. Being able to do that without spending the overwhelming amount of money needed to earn a degree is a very good reason to earn badges instead of degrees.

 

Interpretive:

Badges can be a great way to sidestep the pressures of attaining a degree while proving to employers that you have the skills and abilities needed for a job. Being able to pick and choose essential skills and add to your badge collection is a great way to customize your credentials.

With the idea of badges being fairly new, will employers recognize them for what they are worth? “But just because the badges are awarded doesn’t mean they’ll be recognized by employers or school admission committees” (Do Open Badges Matter to Employers or Admissions Officers?).  From this last article I cited, the future is looking positive for the recognition of badges, but there is more work to be done. “In education technology and beyond, the Open Badge system has ballast. Administrators mainly face questions about how to further integrate the awarding of these digital medals with outside recognition by an ever greater number of parties.”

 

Decisional:

Since you don’t need a degree to be a chef, having badges or a degree doesn’t necessarily apply to me directly. I do think if online learning starts having more presence in culinary arts that badges can be useful to add to your credential. Imagine being a chef and you want to brush up on vegan nutrition or butchery specific to fish, it can add a dimension to chef credentials not present before. Harper College offers digital badges for wine appreciation and wine sommelier (Harper College). Once more institutions adopt the concept of badges, there will be no limit to what skills you can earn a badge for within the culinary arts.

 

References

Teaching Naked by José Anotonio Bowen

Digital Badges in Education: a quick overview

https://blogs.ubc.ca/open/2014/03/28/digital-badges-in-education-a-quick-overview/

Forget College Degrees: Earn Digital Badges Instead by Lynn O’Shaughnessy, CBS Moneywatch

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/forget-the-college-degree-earn-digital-badges-instead/

Do Open Badges Matter to Employers or Admissions Officers? by Justin Stolzfus, SkilledUp for Companies

http://www.skilledup.com/insights/do-open-badges-matter-to-employers-or-admissions-officers

Harper College

http://goforward.harpercollege.edu/ce/certificate/wine.php

3240 Journal Entry #2

Objective:

Virtual study groups allow students to connect together easily without having to be physically present. “Most learning management systems have a group function that allows the professor to create virtual groups with an e-mail list and a shared discussion space, but you can also use any number of social networking sites. Facebook allows groups large and small, and a group hashtag will allow its members to communicate on Twitter.” (Bowan 2014). Students within your virtual study group may be scattered across the country and still have the same collective goals of solving problems within the learning content.

Here is an example from a blog from Boise State University on how to start a virtual study group. Ground rules are set to give general guidelines and expectations of each member. Self-assessments were also recommended to work towards each individual’s strengths and help support weaknesses.

Reflective:

I feel collaborating with peers through virtual study groups is an amazing way to expand each other`s minds. In cooking, there are many different factors in why a recipe or a technique might fail. Being able to have these processes tested from different locations and perspectives can help understand those reasons. Someone might be from an area where the elevation is higher or certain ingredients may be different in terms of taste or texture due to different regions. These factors can be tested to find out reasons for failures or find breakthroughs to make techniques better.

Top Chefs of the world have food labs to create new innovative ideas in a test kitchen with their own culinary team. Here is an article about restaurants that have created food labs to innovate for their respective kitchens (Future of Food). By applying a virtual study group to cooking, you would essentially be creating a food lab that can expand all over the world. Chefs can contribute and learn from each other`s experiments to raise the level of food knowledge within the group.

Interpretive:

Being able to collaborate with peers from many different areas of the world can be very helpful in solving problems by testing them in different conditions. Having the same recipe tested from different perspectives lets us understand the factors which can be ideal or unfavorable to the success of the product. With the ability to connect to peers across the globe easily, the possibilities are endless in what we want to question in the world of cooking.

I am certainly excited about what these virtual groups can achieve but there are concerns about forming such groups. I came across this paper talking about The Seven Problems of Online Learning. Problems four (the free rider), five (possible inequalities of students abilities), and seven (the assessment of individuals in groups) are the ones that stand out to me the most. Forming these groups to promote collaboration is certainly positive, but there is no guarantee that you will have all members contributing equally. Problem five and seven relate to each other where you have to have enough trust to work with someone you may not have the opportunity to meet. Trusting that they have performed experiments or techniques properly can affect the results and compromise the lab at hand.

Decisional:

Having virtual study groups is something I definitely would like to explore. Creating an environment online where my students can visit to interact, learn and collaborate is something I believe is positive.

Before something like this can be conceived, I think I need to be organized in deciding the materials and tools needed for this environment. Guidelines must be set and the students need to have a firm understanding on the purpose of such a group.

Looking at the possibilities I mentioned earlier seems very exciting. I do believe it will take time to scale a virtual study group globally. Being able to find success in a local environment would be a good starting point, and I believe it won’t be long before Chefs from around the world start building connections and friendships through these virtual study groups.

References

Teaching Naked by José Anotonio Bowen

Boise State University

STARTING A VIRTUAL STUDY GROUP

The Future of Food: Ten Cutting-Edge Restaurant Test Kitchens Around the World
by Gabe Ulla
http://www.eater.com/2012/7/11/6566543/the-future-of-food-ten-cutting-edge-restaurant-test-kitchens-around#4253894

The Seven Problems of Online Group Learning (and There Solutions) by Roberts, T.S., and McInnerney, J.M. (2007)
http://www.ifets.info/journals/10_4/22.pdf

PIDP 3240 Journal Entry 1

 

Objective:

 

Customization of education gives an opportunity for learning content to be delivered to a large amount of people providing a choice to cater to each learner using technology. “Technology presents teachers not only with more content than ever before but also more routes into that content”. (Bowan 2014). Instead of the usual reading of textbooks, students have a choice to learn content by watching videos or listening to recordings.

 

Education 2020 (https://education-2020.wikispaces.com/Disruptive+Innovation) describes the change that needs to happen to create a revolution in education and about disrupting the conventional way of teaching to promote change. The site also discusses how online learning is already disrupting the old ways of doing things. “Institutions have acquired new students and saved money by serving courses virtually rather than in classrooms. As technology and courses have improved, more students have begun to take online courses along side regular face to face classes.”

 

The Edvocate (http://www.theedadvocate.org/in-an-ever-changing-online-environment-course-customization-may-reign-supreme/) talks about software like Odysseyware that allows its software to change online curriculum to the educators needs. Content can be added and deleted or rearranged, and you can search curriculum by topic and standard. With this kind of software educators can easily create a curriculum with many different facets for students to choose from.

 

Reflective:

 

After reading and researching about customization online, I feel that changing the way content is delivered can be beneficial to the world of education, but caution must be taken. Giving too many choices may not always have positive effects, especially to who you are giving that choice to. To make this type of education work, the accountability must fall on the learner and I think that we may be giving too much faith on the discipline level of all learners.

 

“Inevitable” is a book on Mass Customized Learning, details the system being implemented in RSU 18. Here is an article about educators who are opposed to this model of education they are implementing and how it is having negative effects for their students.

 

http://www.themainewire.com/2013/05/rsu-18/

 

Letting people have their say is beneficial in terms of letting them be comfortable, but isn’t having people come out of that comfort zone a much more impactful way of learning? Having someone say I only understand when subjects are delivered a certain way may not see how wonderful another delivery system can be because they would never choose it. “…we are creatures of habit, and it may be better to change the modality from time to time. Few people change news sources once they find one with which they agree,..” (Bowen 2014). This last passage lets me think that at the end of the day, we as educators still have to have some say in how to deliver content or students given too much choice may choose to be ignorant in how they want material to be taught.

 

Interpretive:

 

Giving people choices on how to learn with technology can be very helpful to reach out to a large amount of people understand their way. I can see the benefit for students having trouble understanding material with one delivery system can learn the same material by using another. I wonder what would happen when you give a choice to someone that is simply indifferent and can learn from multiple delivery systems? Can giving too much choice confuse students?

 

As well as being able to offer the many alternative delivery systems, instructors need to maintain these avenues and update when needed. I agree that customization can reach out to many different people in a cost effective way but it will also take a lot of effort to evaluate how many different choices to give the learner and how each choice will be effective enough to keep over the others.

 

Decisional:

 

With my field of interest to teach culinary arts, I think I can definitely apply customization to my classes. Instead of having students read a cooking textbook, students may watch a video on how to cut vegetables or how to make a sauce and from that they can practice on their own before class.

 

Although I can do this with many different aspects of cooking, I would be careful in what content I would put in videos or blogs. Giving people too much choice may promote certain aspects of learning but being too choosy may present gaps in what they are learning. Following a certain chef’s blog because of interest in his/her style gives freedom of choice. If that style goes against the fundamentals you are trying to teach, there may conflict with that choice because of those personal preferences.

 

Online learning and customization sounds very appealing to educators who can cater their content to each learner. Finding that balance between giving the best choices, maintaining them, and trusting the learner to stay disciplined in their own interest of learning may be a challenge.

 

 

References

 

Teaching Naked by José Anotonio Bowen

 

Education 2020 by Carla Cross, Karen Hamilton, Debbie Plested and Mary Rezk

https://education-2020.wikispaces.com/Disruptive+Innovation

 

The Edvocate by Matthew Lynch

http://www.theedadvocate.org/in-an-ever-changing-online-environment-course-customization-may-reign-supreme/

 

The Maine Wire May 28, 2013 by Steve Robinson

http://www.themainewire.com/2013/05/rsu-18/

PIDP 3250 Journal Entry 3

JOURNAL ENTRY 3

Objective: This video was posted by classmate Rhonda Hite in her forum “Flipped Classroom Skies the Limit” under the Flipped Classroom category. This video depicts a teacher from Colorado using the Flipped classroom strategy.

Reflective: I have to respect someone who can take an idea of an instructional strategy that is quite different from the conventional way of teaching and apply it with proven success. This video makes me think that anything can be made better, including how to teach while looking at things from a different perspective. I’m inspired when I watch this video and I can see the student’s reception of this strategy to be a positive one. I’ve always known teaching in the traditional sense with teachers in a classroom or lecture hall dictating information and assigning homework while the students take notes and finish assignments at home. I think it takes courage to apply this strategy of instruction knowing that there is limited research on how effective this strategy may be in learning.
( http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/mar13/vol70/num06/Evidence-on-Flipped-Classrooms-Is-Still-Coming-In.aspx).

Interpretive: Although Flipped Learning seems to be gaining momentum in the educational world, there are downsides and instructors need to understand where mistakes can be made when applying this strategy. Students in a flipped classroom have to be comfortable and have access to technology and the internet to view the lessons or lectures. Also, instructors need to be able to trust students to watch lectures at home and there is no guarantee that participation from all students will happen. Testing with a flipped classroom model can be a challenge since this model doesn’t promote improving standardized testing. ( http://www.teachthought.com/trends/10-pros-cons-flipped-classroom/).
Finally, I don’t think the flipped classroom would work for all subjects. If a teacher decides to flip a classroom that isn’t suited for the subject, I think that would have negative effects on the students.
(http://thegrumpygiraffe.wordpress.com/2013/01/19/turning-the-tables-on-flipped-classrooms/)

Decisional: The Flipped Classroom model definitely has its pros and cons. It is up to the instructor to decide whether this model is right for the class and if it’s suited for the subject. As someone who wants to be an instructor in the culinary arts, I believe there are elements that would work in the world of cooking. For generations, households have been watching cooking shows on television trying to grasp how to produce the same results. Imagine watching a cooking show where you can take what you’ve learned and apply it in a classroom kitchen the next day with an instructor guiding you along and correcting mistakes you may make. I really think this model can be the future of culinary education because demonstration of cooking methods can be viewed at home and valuable class time can be utilized with more hands on interaction and having students do the real cooking in class.

References:

http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/mar13/vol70/num06/Evidence-on-Flipped-Classrooms-Is-Still-Coming-In.aspx
http://www.teachthought.com/trends/10-pros-cons-flipped-classroom/
http://thegrumpygiraffe.wordpress.com/2013/01/19/turning-the-tables-on-flipped-classrooms/